Research details

The project is divided in two sets of tasks, which will use methods never (or too seldom) applied to the study of residential high-rises: oral histories, interviews, house biographies and emotional cartography, long-term observation, and documentaries. Three transversal tasks: project coordination, 2 academic-practitioners workshops, and 3 theoretical workshops that build a transdisciplinary environment of analysis, give a common language, and prepare the final conference of the project. Re-injecting the case studies in the theoretical discussions would help deepen and root the analysis of inclusiveness, around the notions of democracy, accessibility, and “living together in the contemporary city”. Four work tasks. After an initial spatio-temporal contextualization of the two case studies (1), the tasks are ordered according to the two ways of apprehending inclusiveness: first, in the fabric of the high-rise residential building (2), then in the way stakeholders value them and construct their discourses and strategies through time (3). We then look beyond to investigate contemporary practices and usages in high-rise living (4).

The project is divided in two sets of tasks, 3 transversal tasks dedicated to the project coordination and workshops and 4 work tasks.

Transversal Tasks

Transversal task 1 is devoted to project steering (36 months).

Transversal task 2 is dedicated to two Academic-practitioners workshops (in 2017 and in 2019). Their objective is to foster a dialogue between researchers, municipal agents and practitioners, to disseminate the academic results on the one side and to collect knowledge and experiences on the other side.The final aim of the transversal task is to provide a set of recommendations to our municipal and practitioner partners.

Transversal task 3 is devoted to theoretical workshops on the major concepts used in the research (2017-2019). Their objective is to build a transdisciplinary environment of analysis and to give a common language to colleagues involved in the project. The task is also responsible for the organization of the final conference of the project.

Work Tasks

After an initial spatio-temporal contextualization of our two case studies (task 1: diagnosis), the tasks are ordered according to the two ways of apprehending inclusiveness: first, in the fabric of the high-rise residential building (tasks 2), then in the way stakeholders value them and construct their discourses and strategies through time (Task 3). We then look beyond the representations of residential high-rises to investigate contemporary practices and usages in high-rise living (task 4). The 4 work tasks are divided into missions.

Work tasks 1-4 are articulated with transversal tasks 2 and 3 during the entire length of the project. Theoretical transdisciplinary seminars of researchers in transversal task 3 (political stakes) will gain from evidences gathered in empirical studies and, in return, help conceptualize issues of inclusiveness in the making and living the high-rise city. Drawing from the empirical analysis (Tasks 1-4), transversal task 2, that brings researchers and practitioners together, will enable the transfer of theoretical and empirical knowledge to the partners by means of a set of recommendations. As previously shown in the SKYLINE research Project (ANR), the best way to identify and formalize recommendations is by creating a continuous dialogue between practitioners and researchers.

In such a collaborative project, the working groups are based on the competences needed to understand the material, social, spatial, and political stakes of the residential high-rise question. Regular meetings will articulate the missions of researchers coming from different backgrounds and disciplines and of practitioners and bring them together around a common language and mutualized results in order to offset the risk of not achieving transdisciplinarity. The persons in charge of the tasks will organize two meetings with all the persons working in the missions. The first will be held at the beginning of the task to coordinate the missions, and the second, at the end, to articulate and stabilize the results.